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Key Research Articles (29)
Corruption and Persistent Informality in Developing Countries: Insights from India ACRN guest blogger Saibal Kar, Associate Professor at the Calcutta Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, discusses the relationship between corruption and the informal sector in India. He shows that higher corruption is associated with higher levels of employment in the informal sector, but that beyond a certain level of state domestic product this effect is nullified. Finally, he considers the scope and implications of “formalizing the informal”. Read More...
Posted at May 07, 2014 05:13 PM
The Role of Social Accountability in Poverty Alleviation Programs in Developing Countries: An Analysis with Reference to Bangladesh Abstract: In spite of different approaches being experimented over the past six decades, poverty alleviation programs in the developing world have largely failed to improve poverty situation. Of all the factors responsible for the growing trend of poverty, the accountability of public officials remains an intriguing one. Read More...
Posted at Apr 17, 2014 04:07 PM
Corruption and persistent informality: An empirical investigation for India Abstract: India is a country characterized by a huge informal sector. At the same time, it is a country where the extent of corruption in every sector is remarkably high. Read More...
Posted at Mar 31, 2014 12:11 PM
A Debate on Integrity and the Crisis of Corruption Aiming to encourage and educate citizens, the Transparency and Integrity Civic Association (TIAC), in partnership with the Centre for Research and Studies in Sociology from the University Institute of Lisbon (CIES-IUL) and the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Lisbon (ICS-UL), held the second edition of the Summer School National Integrity System between 11 and 13 September 2013. Read More...
Posted at Feb 05, 2014 05:17 PM
Inequality and Corruption in Democracies: A Vicious Cycle It is commonly accepted that democracies are generally less corrupt than more authoritarian forms of government, but attempts to explain varying levels of corruption in different democracies often resort to a vague allusion to the “maturity” of a given democracy. Read More...
Posted at Feb 05, 2014 04:57 PM
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Anti-Corruption Datasets (6)
Development, Aid and Governance Indicators This interactive database of aid indicators is based on research by Brookings experts from the Development Assistance and Governance Initiative, in collaboration with others. It allows users to view and interact with a variety of indicators and measures related to international development, aid and governance, and explore the relationships among them. Examples of indicators include aid quality, aid risks and governance. Read More...
Posted at Jul 27, 2012 02:04 PM
World Development Indicators 2011 The primary World Bank collection of development indicators, compiled from officially-recognized international sources, the World Development Indicators (WDI) is the World Bank's flagship statistical publication and establishes the benchmark against which development progress is measured. This 15th edition of WDI in its current format, aims to provide relevant, high-quality, internationally comparable statistics about development and the quality of people’s lives around the globe. It focuses on the impact of the decision to make data freely available under an open license and with better online tools. The section introductions discuss key issues in measuring the economic and social phenomena described in the tables and charts and introduce new sources of data. It includes more than 900 indicators in more than 90 tables organized in 6 sections: World View, People, Environment, Economy, States and Markets, and Global Links. The data includes national, regional and global estimates. Read More...
Posted at Jul 12, 2011 02:16 PM
Global Corruption Barometer With more than 91,500 respondents drawn from 86 countries and territories around the world, Transparency International’s 2010 GCB, released on 9 December 2010, finds the poor to be disproportionately burdened by bribe demands. For most people around the world, political parties, the civil service, parliaments and the police are the institutions perceived to be more affected by corruption. One out of two people interviewed consider their government’s actions to fight corruption to be ineffective, yet, there is a general belief that citizens can make a difference. Most people are willing to report a corrupt act when it occurs Read More...
Posted at Dec 09, 2010 04:00 PM
Corruption Perceptions Index 2010 The Corruption Perceptions Index (CPI) measures the perceived level of public-sector corruption in 180 countries and territories around the world. The CPI is a "survey of surveys", based on 13 different expert and business surveys. The 2010 Corruption Perceptions Index shows that nearly three quarters of the 178 countries in the index score below five, on a scale from 10 (highly clean) to 0 (highly corrupt). These results indicate a serious corruption problem. The complete ranking and analysis of the findings can be found at: http://transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2010/results Please use the link below to download the dataset. Read More...
Posted at Oct 26, 2010 11:15 AM
Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance The Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance uses 84 criteria across four main pillars of safety and rule of law, participation and human rights, sustainable economic opportunity, and human development to assess the quality of governance in Africa. Read More...
Posted at Apr 28, 2010 03:43 PM
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Anti-Corruption Courses and Trainings (11)
  • Human Rights Law Centre Summer School: "Rights of the Child" - 23 to 27 June 2014. Application Deadline 30 May 2014. The objective of this programme is to consider issues concerning the rights of the child that are a matter of current legal, political and societal attention, both internationally and comparatively. These include child participation, child poverty, children in conflict and child rights monitoring and advocacy. Read More...
    Posted at May 13, 2014 04:52 PM
  • The Private Sector & International Development (Columbia Business School) Forming part of the Executive MBA programme at Columbia Business School, this course from 2010 focused on the non-market factors that influence private sector behaviour in the developing world. While these are relevant for the behaviour of firms anywhere, they loom particularly large in poor countries. Topics covered in this course included rule of law (contract enforcement, intellectual property rights, investor protection), corruption and corporate social responsibility. Read More...
    Posted at Nov 14, 2013 07:32 PM
  • Fighting Corruption in Developing Countries: What can donors do? (Sciences Po, Paris) Developed by Bathylle Missika at Sciences Po, this course ran in 2009-10 and provided an overview of the fight against corruption in developing countries, mainly from the perspective of bilateral and multilateral donors’ efforts. The discussion was framed within the broader context of governance efforts in developing countries. The course looked into the many aspects of corruption (administrative vs. political corruption), the actors involved (UN, OECD, Transparency International, etc.), their strategies and tools to address this issue through Official Development Assistance (ODA). It also examined the politics of the anti-corruption “business”. Read More...
    Posted at Nov 14, 2013 07:18 PM
  • Politics and Corruption (University of Chittagong, Bangladesh) This course has been offered to the 4th year B.S.S. Honours students in the department of Political Science at the University of Chittagong, Bangladesh, since 2006. Developed by Professor Muhammad Yeahia Akhter, it looks at global and domestic trends in political corruption and their impact on development, with a special emphasis on Bangladesh. Read More...
    Posted at Nov 14, 2013 02:20 PM
  • Political Corruption and Governance (Columbia University) This course on comparative political corruption is both relevant to the field of comparative politics and public policy, and is suitable for a wide-range of graduate and undergraduate students in political science, public policy, international affairs, business (international business ethics), and law (white-collar crimes). As a comparative politics survey, it will introduce students to several key social science debates on the causes and effects of political corruption. Through on-going discussions about whether corruption hurts economic development and political stability, this class will provide a better understanding of the impact of corruption on bureaucracy, the economy, and society at large. Read More...
    Posted at Nov 14, 2013 02:10 PM
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