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Editors Pick (20)
Global Corruption Report 2007: Judiciary Transparency International’s Global Corruption Report 2007 brought together scholars, legal professionals and civil society activists from around the world to examine how, why and where corruption mars judicial processes, and to reflect on remedies for corruption-tainted systems. It focused on judges and courts, situating them within the broader justice system and exploring the impact of judicial corruption on human rights, economic development and governance. Read More...
Anticorruption Commissions: The “Hong Kong Model” Revisited Over the past 15 years the use of anticorruption commissions (ACCs) has diminished significantly. The reason is that both academics and leading donor organizations have discouraged their use for what appears to be unsubstantiated reasons. Conversely, this paper argues against contemporary thought and proclaims that ACCs should be established more frequently in order to reduce corruption. The author has practitioner experience as former Commissioner of the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) in Hong Kong. The paper is essentially divided into three sections, 1) the reasons why ACCs have been discouraged; 2) a detailed description of the ICAC; and 3) a negation of the reasons used by many contemporary academics and donor organizations to discourage ACCs. Read More...
Anti-Corruption: The Indirect 'Big-Bang' Approach In this article, Rothstein argues that in countries where corruption is wide-spread and systemic, incremental institutional changes based on the advice from the international “good governance regime” are unlikely to work. Thus adding such new instituions as 'anti-corruption agency', or increasing transparency in the policy-making process, is unlikley to lead to any systematic decrease in corruption becasue they are based on the assumption that corruption is a 'principle agent problem' - that is to say that corruption exists due to an asymmetry in information, and if only the everyday citizens simply knew what the corrupt policy-makers were doing, they could choose a cleaner alternative. Rothstein argues that in many cases, such an alternative does not exsist and that corruption should be seen more as a 'collective action problem', thus requiring a major "big bang" type of reform. He illustrates an example of such a reform based on the case of 19th century Sweden. Read More...
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Datasets (5)
Business Environment and Enterprise Performance Survey (BEEPS) The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development and the World Bank Group provide survey data about the ‘business environment’ in 27 Central European and Post-Soviet countries and Turkey. The questions - answered by domestic firms - focus on issues such as: business regulation, taxation, law and order, the judiciary, infrastructure and public administration corruption. Data is availble for years 1999, 2002 and 2005. Read More...
The Rule of Law Index An index consisting of 10 factors (and 49 sub-components, including bribery of politicians and judges) The Rule of Law Index™ is a new quantitative assessment tool designed to offer a deep and comprehensive picture of the extent to which countries abide by the rule of law in practice. In addition to in depth country profiles, the index is available for 35 countries from 2008-2010 and the number of countries in the dataset is expected to expand to 100 by 2012. Read More...
The Rule of Law Index, 2011 The Rule of Law Index is a quantitative assessment tool designed to offer a comprehensive picture of the extent to which countries adhere to the rule of law. The Index presents a comprehensive set of indicators on the rule of law from the perspective of the ordinary person. It examines practical situations in which a rule of law deficit may affect the daily lives of ordinary people. For example, it evaluates whether citizens can access public services without the need to bribe a government officer. The Index provides new data on the following nine dimensions of the rule of law: limited government powers, absence of corruption, order and security, fundamental rights, open government, effective regulatory enforcement, access to civil justice, effective criminal justice, informal justice. Read More...
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