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Editors Pick (8)
Public Opinion Survey Finds Corruption is on the Rise A recent survey released by Transparency International finds that corruption is on the rise, according to more than 91,000 people surveyed in 86 countries and territories. Six out of every 10 people surveyed reported that corruption has worsened in the last three years. In North America and Europe, the figures were 67 per cent and 73 per cent (respectively). Read More...
Measuring Quality of Government and Sub-National Variation In January, 2011, a report, funded by the EU Commission for Regional Development was published by several scholars at the Quality of Government Institute. In this study, new data was produced at the regional level for 172 NUTS ( Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics) regions in the EU for 18 countries from a survey of 34,000 EU in which respondents were asked questions on the quality, impartiality and level of corruption in three key public sector services: education, health care and law enforcement in their region. An index was generated from the survey data, and combined with several national level indicators from the World Bank Governance Indicators, the 'EU QoG Index' (EQI) is now freely available for researchers interest in investigating aspects of governance and corruption at the sub-national level within the EU. On top of the quantitative data provided in the report, 10 qualitative cases studies were also done in several countries/regions with wide within-country variation, such as Italy, Spain and Belgium, where the authors detail several key common institutional charactoristics found in high/low performing regions. Read More...
Anti-Corruption: The Indirect 'Big-Bang' Approach In this article, Rothstein argues that in countries where corruption is wide-spread and systemic, incremental institutional changes based on the advice from the international “good governance regime” are unlikely to work. Thus adding such new instituions as 'anti-corruption agency', or increasing transparency in the policy-making process, is unlikley to lead to any systematic decrease in corruption becasue they are based on the assumption that corruption is a 'principle agent problem' - that is to say that corruption exists due to an asymmetry in information, and if only the everyday citizens simply knew what the corrupt policy-makers were doing, they could choose a cleaner alternative. Rothstein argues that in many cases, such an alternative does not exsist and that corruption should be seen more as a 'collective action problem', thus requiring a major "big bang" type of reform. He illustrates an example of such a reform based on the case of 19th century Sweden. Read More...
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Datasets (6)
Shadow economies all over the world: new estimates for 162 countries from 1999 to 2007 Three researchers from the World Bank have made a serious attempt to capture a country's "shadow economy" (as a percentage of GDP) for 162 countries over a 9 year period. In the paper listed below, they elucidate their methods for capturing this clandestine concept. The authors find signficant variation in the sample, as they find that developing countries have more than twice the level of a "shadow economy" of the 25 welathy, OECD countries in the sample, which they argue increases the burden of taxation and decreases the quality of public goods and services. Read More...
Africa Education Watch (AEW) The AEW provides the first regional overview of accountability and transparency challenges in delivering primary education in seven African countries (Ghana, Madagascar, Morocco, Niger, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Uganda). The report draws on in-depth national assessments of the situation based on desk-studies, user surveys and service provider interviews. Read More...
Posted by fnawaz at Nov 25, 2010 02:18 PM |
Categories: Africa, Education
Global Corruption Barometer With more than 91,500 respondents drawn from 86 countries and territories around the world, Transparency International’s 2010 GCB, released on 9 December 2010, finds the poor to be disproportionately burdened by bribe demands. For most people around the world, political parties, the civil service, parliaments and the police are the institutions perceived to be more affected by corruption. One out of two people interviewed consider their government’s actions to fight corruption to be ineffective, yet, there is a general belief that citizens can make a difference. Most people are willing to report a corrupt act when it occurs Read More...
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