You are here: Home / Topics / Citizen Initiatives

Citizen Initiatives

Editors Pick (24)
Sanctions, Benefits, and Rights: Three Faces of Accountability This paper explores whether decentralised governments provide better accountability mechanisms to citizens by studying 30 randomly selected municipalities in Mexico. It finds that civil society activism is effective in ensuring service delivery, the relationship citizen groups have with local governments is extractive, rather than based on rights and demands of good performance. An appreciation of this distinction in the way accountability mechanisms function on the ground have important implications for the design of policies, programs and projects and in understanding the impact of decentralisation. Read More...
Anticorruption Commissions: The “Hong Kong Model” Revisited Over the past 15 years the use of anticorruption commissions (ACCs) has diminished significantly. The reason is that both academics and leading donor organizations have discouraged their use for what appears to be unsubstantiated reasons. Conversely, this paper argues against contemporary thought and proclaims that ACCs should be established more frequently in order to reduce corruption. The author has practitioner experience as former Commissioner of the Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) in Hong Kong. The paper is essentially divided into three sections, 1) the reasons why ACCs have been discouraged; 2) a detailed description of the ICAC; and 3) a negation of the reasons used by many contemporary academics and donor organizations to discourage ACCs. Read More...
Anti-Corruption: The Indirect 'Big-Bang' Approach In this article, Rothstein argues that in countries where corruption is wide-spread and systemic, incremental institutional changes based on the advice from the international “good governance regime” are unlikely to work. Thus adding such new instituions as 'anti-corruption agency', or increasing transparency in the policy-making process, is unlikley to lead to any systematic decrease in corruption becasue they are based on the assumption that corruption is a 'principle agent problem' - that is to say that corruption exists due to an asymmetry in information, and if only the everyday citizens simply knew what the corrupt policy-makers were doing, they could choose a cleaner alternative. Rothstein argues that in many cases, such an alternative does not exsist and that corruption should be seen more as a 'collective action problem', thus requiring a major "big bang" type of reform. He illustrates an example of such a reform based on the case of 19th century Sweden. Read More...
More…
Datasets (3)
Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance The Mo Ibrahim Index of African Governance uses 84 criteria across four main pillars of safety and rule of law, participation and human rights, sustainable economic opportunity, and human development to assess the quality of governance in Africa. Read More...
The Rule of Law Index, 2011 The Rule of Law Index is a quantitative assessment tool designed to offer a comprehensive picture of the extent to which countries adhere to the rule of law. The Index presents a comprehensive set of indicators on the rule of law from the perspective of the ordinary person. It examines practical situations in which a rule of law deficit may affect the daily lives of ordinary people. For example, it evaluates whether citizens can access public services without the need to bribe a government officer. The Index provides new data on the following nine dimensions of the rule of law: limited government powers, absence of corruption, order and security, fundamental rights, open government, effective regulatory enforcement, access to civil justice, effective criminal justice, informal justice. Read More...
The European Social Survey, ESS Round 5 - 2010 The European Social Survey (ESS) is an academically-driven multi-country survey, which has been administered in over 30 countries to date. It has three aims - First, to monitor and interpret changing public attitudes and values within Europe and to investigate how they interact with Europe's changing institutions; Second, to advance and consolidate improved methods of cross-national survey measurement in Europe and beyond; and third, to develop a series of European social indicators, including attitudinal indicators. This fifth round of the survey covers 28 countries, which includes Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.The questionnaire includes two main sections, each consisting of approximately 120 items; a 'core' module which remains relatively constant from round to round, plus two or more 'rotating' modules, repeated at intervals. The core module aims to monitor change and continuity in a wide range of social variables, including media use; social and public trust; political interest and participation; socio-political orientations; governance and efficacy; moral; political and social values; social exclusion, national, ethnic and religious allegiances; well-being; health and security; human values; demographics and socio-economics. Read More...
 
Courses (2)
 
 

Our partners