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DataSet VCS/ICS calendar The Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey - Higher School of Economics
'The Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (RLMS) is a series of nationally representative surveys designed to monitor the effects of Russian reforms on the health and economic welfare of households and individuals in the Russian Federation. These effects are measured by a variety of means: detailed monitoring of individuals' health status and dietary intake, precise measurement of household-level expenditures and service utilization, and collection of relevant community-level data, including region-specific prices and community infrastructure data. Data have been collected 18 times since 1992.' This longitudinal survey could become a valuable source of information for researchers working on the problems of petty corruption in healthcare in Russia. The section 'Medical services' of the Adult Questionannaire in almost all the waves of the survey includes a big range of questions on informal payments for healthcare.
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DataSet The Rule of Law Index, 2011
The Rule of Law Index is a quantitative assessment tool designed to offer a comprehensive picture of the extent to which countries adhere to the rule of law. The Index presents a comprehensive set of indicators on the rule of law from the perspective of the ordinary person. It examines practical situations in which a rule of law deficit may affect the daily lives of ordinary people. For example, it evaluates whether citizens can access public services without the need to bribe a government officer. The Index provides new data on the following nine dimensions of the rule of law: limited government powers, absence of corruption, order and security, fundamental rights, open government, effective regulatory enforcement, access to civil justice, effective criminal justice, informal justice.
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DataSet Doing Business 2012: Doing Business in a More Transparent World
This year's ranking and report assesses regulations affecting domestic firms in 183 economies and ranks the economies in 10 areas of business regulation, such as starting a business, resolving insolvency and trading across borders. The report rankings on ease of doing business have expanded to include indicators on getting electricity. In this year's rankings Singapore leads on the overall ease of doing business, followed by Hong Kong SAR, China; New Zealand; the United States; and Denmark.
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DataSet The European Social Survey, ESS Round 5 - 2010
The European Social Survey (ESS) is an academically-driven multi-country survey, which has been administered in over 30 countries to date. It has three aims - First, to monitor and interpret changing public attitudes and values within Europe and to investigate how they interact with Europe's changing institutions; Second, to advance and consolidate improved methods of cross-national survey measurement in Europe and beyond; and third, to develop a series of European social indicators, including attitudinal indicators. This fifth round of the survey covers 28 countries, which includes Belgium, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Israel, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russian Federation, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and United Kingdom.The questionnaire includes two main sections, each consisting of approximately 120 items; a 'core' module which remains relatively constant from round to round, plus two or more 'rotating' modules, repeated at intervals. The core module aims to monitor change and continuity in a wide range of social variables, including media use; social and public trust; political interest and participation; socio-political orientations; governance and efficacy; moral; political and social values; social exclusion, national, ethnic and religious allegiances; well-being; health and security; human values; demographics and socio-economics.
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DataSet 2011 Financial Secrecy Index
The Financial Secrecy Index is a tool for understanding global financial secrecy, corruption and illicit financial flows. The FSI combines two measurements, one qualitative and one quantitative. The qualitative measure looks at a jurisdiction’s laws and regulations, international treaties, and so on, to assess how secretive it is. The assessment is given in the form of a secrecy score: the higher the score, the more secretive the jurisdiction. The second, quantitative, measurement attaches a weighting to take account of the jurisdiction’s size and overall importance to the global financial markets. The 2011 Financial Secrecy Index (FSI) focuses on 73 secrecy jurisdictions. These places set up laws and systems which provide legal and financial secrecy to others, elsewhere. The index reveals that the traditional stereotype of tax havens is misplaced. The FSI reveals without doubt that the world’s most important providers of financial secrecy are not small, palm-fringed islands as many suppose, but some of the world’s biggest and wealthiest countries.
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DataSet 2011 East Africa Bribery Index
The index aims at measuring bribery levels in both the public and private sectors in the five countries in the region - Uganda, Kenya, Burundi, Rwanda and Tanzania. In the 2011 edition, a survey was conducted with almost 13,000 randomly selected respondents in all countries between February and May 2011. The results showed that Burundi continues to be the country with the highest level of bribery (37.9%) in the region, followed by Uganda (33%) and Tanzania (31.6%). Rwanda is the least bribery prone country, with a bribery prevalence of 5.1%.
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DataSet 2011 Ibrahim Index of African Governance
the Ibrahim Index is the most comprehensive collection of quantitative data that provides an annual assessment of governance performance in every African country. It compiles 86 indicators grouped into 14 sub-categories and four overarching categories to measure the effective delivery of public goods and services to African citizens. Topics covered by the index include: Rule of law, accountability, personal safety, participation, gender, human rights, public management, infrastructure, education and health.
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DataSet 2011 Aid Transparency Index
The 2011 pilot Aid Transparency Index collects for the first time primary data on aid transparency levels, with help from civil society organisations (CSOs) in 34 countries. The Index assesses the availability of specific information items at organisational, country and activity level for 58 donor organisations, including bilateral and multilateral donors, International Financial Institutions (IFIs) and private foundations. It then ranks these donors by assigning scores for whether specific aid information was published combined with an organisational level assessment of whether the donor is participating in the International Aid Transparency Initiative and whether they have a Freedom of Information law (or equivalent disclosure policy).
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DataSet 2011 Bribe Payers Index
The Bribe Payers Index is a unique tool capturing the supply side of international bribery, specifically focussing on bribes paid by the private sector. The 2011 Bribe Payers Index is the fifth edition of the index, ranking 28 of the world’s largest economies according to the likelihood of firms from these countries to bribe when doing business abroad. It is based on the results of Transparency International’s 2011 Bribe Payers Survey. This asked 3,016 senior business executives in 30 countries around the world for their perceptions of the likelihood of companies, from countries they have business dealings with, to engage in bribery when doing business in the executive’s country. A sectoral ranking is also available which scores and ranks 19 sectors. The survey asked how often three different types of bribery were perceived to occur in each sector: firstly, bribery of low-ranking public officials; secondly, improper contributions to high-ranking politicians to achieve influence; and thirdly, bribery between private companies.
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DataSet Global Right to Information Rating
The Right to Information (RTI) rating, which covers 89 countries around the world, was developed by Access Info Europe and the Centre for Law and Democracy. The central idea behind the RTI Rating is to provide RTI advocates, reformers, legislators and others with a reliable tool for assessing the overall strength of the legal framework in their country for RTI. The Rating also indicates the strengths and weaknesses of the legal framework in seven different categories, namely: Right of Access, Scope, Requesting Procedures, Exceptions and Refusals, Appeals, Sanctions and Protections, and Promotional Measures. There are a total of 61 Indicators, each with a range of possible scores which in most cases is 0-2, for a possible total of 150 points. The Indicators are drawn from a wide range of international standards on the right to information, as well as comparative study of numerous right to information laws from around the world. A standardised scoring tool, based on the Indicators, was developed to ensure that the points under each Indicator were allocated consistently across different countries. The scoring tool was then applied to each of the 89 countries with right to information laws around the world by researchers at CLD and AIE. The analysis shows vast room for improvement: two thirds of countries (64%) scored in the middle range, between 60 and 100 points out of 150. Typical weaknesses were the limited scope, over-broad exceptions regimes, shortcomings in oversight and appeals mechanisms, and lack of legal requirements to promote awareness of the public's right of access to information. Please see link for more details.
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