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DataSet 2011 Financial Secrecy Index
The Financial Secrecy Index is a tool for understanding global financial secrecy, corruption and illicit financial flows. The FSI combines two measurements, one qualitative and one quantitative. The qualitative measure looks at a jurisdiction’s laws and regulations, international treaties, and so on, to assess how secretive it is. The assessment is given in the form of a secrecy score: the higher the score, the more secretive the jurisdiction. The second, quantitative, measurement attaches a weighting to take account of the jurisdiction’s size and overall importance to the global financial markets. The 2011 Financial Secrecy Index (FSI) focuses on 73 secrecy jurisdictions. These places set up laws and systems which provide legal and financial secrecy to others, elsewhere. The index reveals that the traditional stereotype of tax havens is misplaced. The FSI reveals without doubt that the world’s most important providers of financial secrecy are not small, palm-fringed islands as many suppose, but some of the world’s biggest and wealthiest countries.
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DataSet 2011 Aid Transparency Index
The 2011 pilot Aid Transparency Index collects for the first time primary data on aid transparency levels, with help from civil society organisations (CSOs) in 34 countries. The Index assesses the availability of specific information items at organisational, country and activity level for 58 donor organisations, including bilateral and multilateral donors, International Financial Institutions (IFIs) and private foundations. It then ranks these donors by assigning scores for whether specific aid information was published combined with an organisational level assessment of whether the donor is participating in the International Aid Transparency Initiative and whether they have a Freedom of Information law (or equivalent disclosure policy).
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DataSet 2011 Bribe Payers Index
The Bribe Payers Index is a unique tool capturing the supply side of international bribery, specifically focussing on bribes paid by the private sector. The 2011 Bribe Payers Index is the fifth edition of the index, ranking 28 of the world’s largest economies according to the likelihood of firms from these countries to bribe when doing business abroad. It is based on the results of Transparency International’s 2011 Bribe Payers Survey. This asked 3,016 senior business executives in 30 countries around the world for their perceptions of the likelihood of companies, from countries they have business dealings with, to engage in bribery when doing business in the executive’s country. A sectoral ranking is also available which scores and ranks 19 sectors. The survey asked how often three different types of bribery were perceived to occur in each sector: firstly, bribery of low-ranking public officials; secondly, improper contributions to high-ranking politicians to achieve influence; and thirdly, bribery between private companies.
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DataSet Where the Bribes Are Paid - Interactive Database
This interactive database compiles decades of data on violations and penalties under the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.S. flagship legislation that makes bribery of foreign officials a crime. Since its inception, prosecutors have penalized over 200 companies under the FCPA in about 80 countries, amassing about $4 billion in penalties. The database, called Where the Bribes are Paid , allows users to see how the total penalties amassed in each country break down by sector.
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DataSet Global Right to Information Rating
The Right to Information (RTI) rating, which covers 89 countries around the world, was developed by Access Info Europe and the Centre for Law and Democracy. The central idea behind the RTI Rating is to provide RTI advocates, reformers, legislators and others with a reliable tool for assessing the overall strength of the legal framework in their country for RTI. The Rating also indicates the strengths and weaknesses of the legal framework in seven different categories, namely: Right of Access, Scope, Requesting Procedures, Exceptions and Refusals, Appeals, Sanctions and Protections, and Promotional Measures. There are a total of 61 Indicators, each with a range of possible scores which in most cases is 0-2, for a possible total of 150 points. The Indicators are drawn from a wide range of international standards on the right to information, as well as comparative study of numerous right to information laws from around the world. A standardised scoring tool, based on the Indicators, was developed to ensure that the points under each Indicator were allocated consistently across different countries. The scoring tool was then applied to each of the 89 countries with right to information laws around the world by researchers at CLD and AIE. The analysis shows vast room for improvement: two thirds of countries (64%) scored in the middle range, between 60 and 100 points out of 150. Typical weaknesses were the limited scope, over-broad exceptions regimes, shortcomings in oversight and appeals mechanisms, and lack of legal requirements to promote awareness of the public's right of access to information. Please see link for more details.
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DataSet Development, Aid and Governance Indicators
This interactive database of aid indicators is based on research by Brookings experts from the Development Assistance and Governance Initiative, in collaboration with others. It allows users to view and interact with a variety of indicators and measures related to international development, aid and governance, and explore the relationships among them. Examples of indicators include aid quality, aid risks and governance.
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DataSet Putting Corruption Out of Business
Transparency International carried out a survey of 3,000 business people in 30 diverse countries around the world. The survey was conducted from May-July 2011 and asked business people not just for their views on bribery and corruption, but also on what works to stop corruption in the private sector and what the business community can do to put corruption out of business. An interactive website set up to showcase the findings allows users to compare the data across countries, sectors, gender of respondent and more. Please see link for more details.
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Blog Entry Troff document Fighting Corruption, What Works and What Does Not
Mungiu-Pippidi argues current anti-corruption strategies are not achieving impact
Located in ANTICORRP News
Blog Entry Who is Succeeding and Why?
ANTICORRP researchers gather in Hamburg to discuss corruption indicators and compare contemporary anti-corruption achievements in a number of countries.
Located in ANTICORRP News
Blog Entry ANTICORRP Report Shows Regional Achievers in Control of Corruption
A global corruption trends report prepared by the ERCAS team for project ANTICORRP highlights best and worst performers on control of corruption across eight world regions
Located in ANTICORRP News

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