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2014 ACRN RESEARCH PAPER CONTEST WINNERS ANNOUNCED!
09 Dec 2014

2014 ACRN RESEARCH PAPER CONTEST WINNERS ANNOUNCED!

We are very happy to announce the results of the 2014 ACRN Research Paper competition. This competition gives emerging scholars an opportunity to take up the challenge of filling important knowledge gaps in the field of corruption, present innovative approaches for measuring and understanding corruption and showcase new findings on what works and what does not in tackling corruption and ensuring sound governance.

Returning ‘Politically Exposed Persons’ Illicit Assets from Switzerland – International Law in the Force Field of Complexity and Conditionality
02 Dec 2014

Returning ‘Politically Exposed Persons’ Illicit Assets from Switzerland – International Law in the Force Field of Complexity and Conditionality

Research correspondent Giulio Nessi reviews an article dealing with the international law implications of illegally acquired assets being transferred to Switzerland by ‘Politically Exposed Persons.’

Be prepared after you blow the whistle
28 Nov 2014

Be prepared after you blow the whistle

This article outlines the consequences that whistleblowers face after having blown the whistle, focusing on workplace bullying, drawing parallels to health issues that occur after traumatic events.

Indignation or Resignation: The Implications of Transparency for Societal Accountability
26 Nov 2014

Indignation or Resignation: The Implications of Transparency for Societal Accountability

ACRN Research Correspondent Brigitte Zimmerman reflects on the findings of an article by Monika Bauhr and Marcia Grimes that considers the conditions under which transparency results in citizen engagement.

Belief in a Just World Lowers Perceived Intention of Corruption: The Mediating Role of Perceived Punishment
12 Nov 2014

Belief in a Just World Lowers Perceived Intention of Corruption: The Mediating Role of Perceived Punishment

This paper investigates how belief in a just world influences the perception of others’ intention to participate in corruption.

Breaking the Resource Curse: Transparency in the Natural Resource Sector and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative
05 Nov 2014

Breaking the Resource Curse: Transparency in the Natural Resource Sector and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative

Transparency a panacea for resource rich countries? - A new empirical analysis shows mixed results with regard to the effectiveness of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI).

Using ICTs to create a culture of transparency: E-government and social media as openness and anti-corruption tools for societies
03 Nov 2014

Using ICTs to create a culture of transparency: E-government and social media as openness and anti-corruption tools for societies

Bertot, Jaeger and Grimes assess the potential for ICTs to be a change agent for openness and transparency. While they show the difficulties in the acceptance of these tools in some societies, the authors remain optimistic about their potential impact and formulate recommendations on how to use ICTs to support transparency in the fight against corruption

Research Article
27 Oct 2014

Nobody likes a rat: On the willingness to report lies and the consequences thereof

How do groups react towards known whistleblowers in their midst? Apparently, they try to get rid of them. This study indicates that even the non-corrupt individuals prefer not having whistleblowers in their groups.

The pros and cons of the revolving door practice – the main arguments
21 Oct 2014

The pros and cons of the revolving door practice – the main arguments

This blog post profiles some of the main arguments in favour and against the practice of revolving door. It then examines to what extent these arguments are substantiated by the latest crop of empirical studies in the field, finding that downside risks outweigh upside benefits. This is the first part of a blog series on the revolving door phenomenon.

How to measure and monitor the revolving door? Data-sources and evolving approaches
21 Oct 2014

How to measure and monitor the revolving door? Data-sources and evolving approaches

In a first blog, Dieter Zinnbauer looked at some of the main arguments in favour and against the practice of revolving door and how they are substantiated by the latest empirical studies, finding that downside risks outweigh upside benefits. This blog focusses on the research approaches and data that are being used to study the revolving door phenomenon.

Research Article
20 Oct 2014

The Political Power of Social Media: Technology, the Public Sphere, and Political Change

In this seminal article Clay Shirky analyses the potential of social media to induce political change. He argues that social media are an important tool to support civil society and the public sphere and that they can be vital in forming a political environment of change.

Research Article
15 Oct 2014

Can Corruption be Studied in the Lab?: Comparing a Field and a Lab Experiment

This paper makes an attempt at testing the external validity of corruption lab experiments.

Research Article
26 Sep 2014

Political Institutions and Corruption: An Experimental Examination of the “Right to Recall”

ACRN Research Correspondent Eugen Dimant reviews a new paper on the interrelation between the citizens’ right to "recall" officials and corruption levels.

Research Article
24 Sep 2014

Input and Output Legitimacy of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives

Under which conditions can multi-stakeholder initiatives be legitimated? – Mena and Palazzo try to give the answer by presenting a set of newly developed legitimacy criteria, illustrating their concept with a wide range of MSI examples.

Research Article
22 Sep 2014

Fighting Corruption with Social Accountability: A Comparative Analysis of Social Accountability Mechanisms’ Potential to Reduce Corruption in Public Administration

ACRN Research Correspondent Brigitte Zimmerman reviews a recent paper that argues social accountability mechanisms are effective only against a backdrop of electoral accountability

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