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Political Corruption (University of Sussex)

Developed by Dr. Dan Hough, this third year undergraduate course runs in the Spring and Summer terms at the University of Sussex in the UK. It is one of a range of teaching and research activities within the newly-founded 'Sussex Centre for the Study of Corruption (SCSC)'. This course has been running since 2005; it is multi-disciplinary in nature and analyses what corruption is, where it flourishes and, most importantly, what can be done about it.

The course uses literature from political science, political economy, anthropology and also law in with the aim of helping students come to terms with the diverse forms that corruption can take and the strategies that might be involved in counteracting it.

Although the course is an integral part of Sussex's undergraduate politics and policy joint degrees, it is hoped that in the future it will become an important pathway to the newly developed MA in Corruption and Governance course that the SCSC will be launching in 2012-13.  

 Some sample modules and readings for the course are as follows:


Defining political corruption

Discussion topics:

  • Which of the different definitions of political corruption that exist do you find most persuasive/problematic and why? 
  • Why are there so many different definitions? 
  • Can anything be done to simplify the process of defining corruption?

Sample readings:

J.A. Gardiner, ‘Defining Corruption’, in A. J. Heidenheimer and M. Johnston (eds.), Political Corruption: Concepts and Contexts (London: Transaction Publishers, 2005), pp. 25-40

M. Philp, ‘Defining Political Corruption’, Political Studies 45 (3) : 436-462, 1997 


Measuring political corruption

Discussion topics: 

  • How have international organisations attempted to measure political corruption? 
  • On what grounds are these attempts criticised? 
  • How legitimate are these criticisms? 
  • How influential are the indices and comparative analyses in prompting specific anti-corruption measures

Sample readings:

M. Johnston, ‘Measuring the New Corruption Rankings: Implications for Analysis and Reform’, in A. J. Heidenheimer and M. Johnston (eds.) Political Corruption: Concepts and Contexts (London: Transaction Publishers, 2005), pp. 865-884

Transparency International Corruption Perceptions Index 2010.  Available on http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/cpi/2010/results

Transparency International Bribe Payers Index 2008: Available on http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/bpi/bpi_2008

Transparency International Global Corruption Barometer Survey 2009: Available on http://www.transparency.org/policy_research/surveys_indices/gcb/2009


Corruption in Democratising/Non-Democratic Countries 

Discussion topics:

  • What (if any) are the traditional traits of corruption in non-democratic countries?
  • Is there a type (or types) of corruption that is particularly prevalent to democratising countries?
  • What challenges do democratising and developing countries face in attempting to combat corruption?

Sample readings:

M. Chadda, ‘India: Between Majesty and Mystery’, in R. A. Johnson (ed.) The Struggle against Corruption (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2004), pp. 109-144

S. Huntington, ‘Modernization and Corruption’, in A. J. Heidenheimer and M. Johnston (eds.) Political Corruption: Concepts and Contexts (London: Transaction Publishers, 2005), pp. 253-264

J. Martirossian, ‘Russia and her Ghosts of the Past’, in R. A. Johnson (ed.) The Struggle against Corruption (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2004), pp. 81-108

 

For a more detailed syllabus, please contact us.  

 


05 Oct 2011



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