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Course Political Corruption and Governance (Columbia University)
This course on comparative political corruption is both relevant to the field of comparative politics and public policy, and is suitable for a wide-range of graduate and undergraduate students in political science, public policy, international affairs, business (international business ethics), and law (white-collar crimes). As a comparative politics survey, it will introduce students to several key social science debates on the causes and effects of political corruption. Through on-going discussions about whether corruption hurts economic development and political stability, this class will provide a better understanding of the impact of corruption on bureaucracy, the economy, and society at large.
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Course Politics and Corruption (University of Chittagong, Bangladesh)
This course has been offered to the 4th year B.S.S. Honours students in the department of Political Science at the University of Chittagong, Bangladesh, since 2006. Developed by Professor Muhammad Yeahia Akhter, it looks at global and domestic trends in political corruption and their impact on development, with a special emphasis on Bangladesh.
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Course object code Fighting Corruption in Developing Countries: What can donors do? (Sciences Po, Paris)
Developed by Bathylle Missika at Sciences Po, this course ran in 2009-10 and provided an overview of the fight against corruption in developing countries, mainly from the perspective of bilateral and multilateral donors’ efforts. The discussion was framed within the broader context of governance efforts in developing countries. The course looked into the many aspects of corruption (administrative vs. political corruption), the actors involved (UN, OECD, Transparency International, etc.), their strategies and tools to address this issue through Official Development Assistance (ODA). It also examined the politics of the anti-corruption “business”.
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Course chemical/x-pdb The Private Sector & International Development (Columbia Business School)
Forming part of the Executive MBA programme at Columbia Business School, this course from 2010 focused on the non-market factors that influence private sector behaviour in the developing world. While these are relevant for the behaviour of firms anywhere, they loom particularly large in poor countries. Topics covered in this course included rule of law (contract enforcement, intellectual property rights, investor protection), corruption and corporate social responsibility.
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Course Human Rights Law Centre Summer School: "Rights of the Child" - 23 to 27 June 2014. Application Deadline 30 May 2014.
The objective of this programme is to consider issues concerning the rights of the child that are a matter of current legal, political and societal attention, both internationally and comparatively. These include child participation, child poverty, children in conflict and child rights monitoring and advocacy.
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Course C header Corruption, Conflict and Peacebuilding (Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University)
This course is a module of Tufts University Graduate Program. It looks at the nexus between conflict, corruption and peace as a cutting-edge issue in post-conflict state building. The course provides a comprehensive grounding in the basics of the corruption literature, reviews current approaches to anti-corruption measures at the policy and practice level, provides insights into how corruption and anti-corruption concepts can be applied to conflict environments.
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Course Political Corruption and Governance (Columbia University)
This course on comparative political corruption is both relevant to the field of comparative politics and public policy, and is suitable for a wide-range of graduate and undergraduate students in political science, public policy, international affairs, business (international business ethics), and law (white-collar crimes). As a comparative politics survey, it will introduce students to several key social science debates on the causes and effects of political corruption. Through on-going discussions about whether corruption hurts economic development and political stability, this class will provide a better understanding of the impact of corruption on bureaucracy, the economy, and society at large.
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Course Corruption: Global Perspectives (Rutgers University)
With the World Bank estimating that globally about $1 trillion per year is paid in bribes, and that this illegality leads to poor economic performance and human rights violations, this course examines the phenomenon of corruption, identifies the contexts within which it flourishes, explores means of measuring it, and analyses the opportunity structure for corruption. The course also focuses on corruption control, and co-operative arrangements which aim to prevent and contain corruption.
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Course object code Fighting Corruption in Developing Countries: What can donors do? (Sciences Po)
Developed by Bathylle Missika at Sciences Po, this course provides an overview of the fight against corruption in developing countries, mainly from the perspective of bilateral and multilateral donors’ efforts. The discussions are framed within the broader context of governance efforts in developing countries. The course looks into the many aspects of corruption (administrative vs. political corruption), the actors involved (UN, OECD, Transparency International, etc.), their strategies and tools to address this issue through Official Development Assistance (ODA). It also looks at the politics of the anti-corruption “business”.
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Course Political Corruption (University of Sussex)
Developed by Dr. Dan Hough, this third year undergraduate course runs in the Spring and Summer terms at the University of Sussex in the UK. It is one of a range of teaching and research activities within the newly-founded 'Sussex Centre for the Study of Corruption (SCSC)'. This course has been running since 2005; it is multi-disciplinary in nature and analyses what corruption is, where it flourishes and, most importantly, what can be done about it.
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